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THE NEWSLETTER OF LASELL COLLEGE 



I 



SPRING 2000 



KRESGE FOUNDATION AWARDS 
CHALLENGE GRANT TO LASELL 



See story in Lasell 150 Supplement on page 17 



A DAY IN THE LIFE: LASELL STUDENTS 




Brittany Jackson '01, Nikki Sweeten '03, Mike Norton 
'03, and Chris Hufnagel '02 participated in the special 
Leaves-inspiied Campus 2000 photo essay project. 

See CAMPUS 2000 
story on pages 4-5 



Camp 



9 
us 2000 



INSIDE: 



Message from the President 2 

New Lasell Board Members Elected 2 

Faculty Bring Technology to the Classroom. . . 3 

Lasell Student Presents at Poetry Festival 3 

Campus 2000 4-5 

People at Lasell 6 

Memories Project 7 

Campus Update 8-9 

Sports News 10-11 

Heritage Society News 12 

Annual Fund News 13 

Alumni News and Events 14-15 

Athletic Calendar 16 

Campaign 1 50 Supplement 17 



SPECIAL ISSUE: tAMPUS 1000 



: ODAY'S REINVIGORATED LASELL IS LIGHT YEARS AWAY FROM THE SMALL, 
noble, one-building educational experiment for young women divined by Edward Lasell 
in 185 L Rutty, dirt roads have given way to smoothly paved streets. Gaslight has yielded 
its glow to electricity, and the only horsepower now utilized comes under the hoods of 
sophisticated automobiles that are as fast and powerful as a team of thoroughbreds and 
contain most of the luxuries of home. 



People dress differently, of course, and there 
are men on a campus that for 146 years was 
devoted to educating women. But the most aston- 
ishing transformation, many agree, has been the 
Hghtning-fast infusion of technology into the life 
of the people and the campus. 

Telephones, television, faxes, cell phones, 
beepers, scannable identification cards, and the 
ubiquitous computer are now seamlessly woven 
into the fabric of life on our 21^'- century campus. 
From online learning, time /date stamped voice 
mail, email, and multimedia presentations to 
Internet research, instantaneous data swapping. 



and virtual online office space for document/ 
presentation sharing, LaseU's campus 2000 has 
evolved into a totally plugged in environment. 

This issue of Leaves focuses on the look, feel, 
and sensibilities of LaseU's first year in the 21^"- 
century. Through articles on students (see story 
on page 4), faculty (see story on page 3), and 
new building initiatives (see story on page 8), we 
hope to give you a sense of how today's LaseU — 
driven resoundingly forward by growing enroll- 
ment and institutional pride — is meeting 
the need to provide a stiniulating, essential atmos- 
phere of high-tech Uving and learning. »- 











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NON-PROFIT ORG. 

U.S. POSTAGE 
PAID 

BOSTON, MA 
PERMIT NO. 51347 






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Lasell College 

OFFICE OF INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT 
1844 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE 
NEWTON, MA 02466-2716 




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Enhancing the Classroom with Technology 

TWO LASELL FACULTY MEMBERS AWARDED PACKARD GRANTS 

JNIo LONGER ARE CHALKBOARDS, FELT ERASERS, WEIGHTY TEXTBOOKS, AND 
lectures the only instruments available to the educator in the classroom. More and more, 
today's learning environments rely on computers and powerful multimedia presentations 
to seize a student's attention, elucidate a complex theory or drive home a critical concept. 



LASELL WATCH 



Countdown to Lasell 150 

An at-a-glance update on the state of the College: 

• Progress is being made on many academic initia- 
tives, from an honors program to core curriculum 
reform and greater flexibility in requirements for 
majors so that students can consider double major- 
ing or adding minors. 

• Applications for admission continue to be strong: 
we have 1728 applications compared to 1306 last 
year (about 27% are from men). 

• The budget for this year is balanced, with 
prospects for a reasonable surplus which v^ be 
used to complete renovations to Potter and a face- 
lift for Irwin Hall. 

• Budget planning for next year has conrnienced 
and incorporates an ambitious strategy to improve 
LaseU's academic standing through better stu- 
dents, many more full-time faculty, and greater 



See PACKARD GRANTS 
continued on page 3 




investment in faculty 
and staff development. 

• The two main construction projects are prcxreeding 
well: Winslow is on schedide and on budget; the 
new student residence is six weeks behind and 
slightly over cost. Both wiU be ready for the fall. 

• Fundraising continues to go well; the annual fund 
is ahead of schedule and the canipaign has crossed 
the $13,000,000 mark. 

• Lasell receives a highly competitive grant from 
the Kresge Foundation to help fund the Winslow 
Renovation Project (see story on page 17). 

• Lasell Village — the College's trend-setting contin- 
uing care retirement community v^th its xmique, 
built-in educational component — is exjjected to 
have welcomed its first residents in May. More 
than 85% of the 162 units are sold. »- 



MESSAGE FROM THE 



PRESIDENT 



Today's Lasell: Edward Lasell Would Be Proud 

J\s I LOOK OUT OF THE WINDOW OF MY OFFICE I SEE A VIBRANT CAMPUS AND 
enthusiastic students. I also see a magnificent landscape dotted with Victorian homes which reflects 
the old Lasell and three nearly complete construction projects which represent the new Lasell. If I 
could sum up my presidency in one word, it would be "change." So much has changed since I began 
my tenure as president in 1988. And as we prepare to celebrate Lasell's 150th anniversary I often 
imagine what it would be like if Edward Lasell were able to come back to the campus to see how 
much has changed since he founded the Auburndale Seminary for Women back in 1851. 




The College was founded during what was 
known as "the age of steam." What a wonderful 
contrast to today's "age of technology." What 
would we do without fax machines, cellular tele- 
phones, the Internet, laptop computers, e-com- 
merce, cable television, digital cameras, laser print- 
ers, compact discs, beepers, video conferencing, 
and remote controls. The list is endless. However, 
to remain competitive in higher education today, 
we must be at the leading edge of technology. 
And as we all know, technology is expensive. I 
am proud to say that we have invested more than 
$3 nuUion in the technology infrastructure at 
Lasell. Very few schools our size can boast that 
almost every building on campus is wired to the 
College's network and the Internet. Each residence 
hall, including the brand new 116-bed, sviite-style 
dormitory, has a port-per-piUow. Every student 
who lives on campus can hook up his or her com- 
puter to the network and has access to the World 
Wide Web. The wiring also gives students access 
to a telephone and cable television. 



All of Lasell's faculty and staff are connected 
to a campus-wide administrative software pack- 
age that allows everyone to communicate and 
exchange information with one another. And 
when the renovation of Winslow Hall is complete, 
there will be seven new high technology class- 
rooms. Each "smart classroom" will have instruc- 
tor computers connected to the College network 
and Internet, with the capability to project on a 
screen, CD /DVD drives, SmartBoards and Visual 
Presenters. Even the auditorium will have a hook- 
up for teleconferencing. 

Most of this would not be possible, by the 
way, without the generous support of our alunmi 
and friends. You have stepped up to the plate to 
provide the resources necessary to make all of 
these changes happen. And Lasell was recently 
recognized for this collective effort when The 
Kresge Foxmdation, one of the most prestigious 
foimdations in the coimtry, awarded us a $400,000 
challenge grant to support the Winslow 
Renovation Project. How far we have come! 



From the sewing rooms and typing rooms of 
Lasell in its early days, to the CAD /CAM labora- 
tory and athletic training lab of today, Lasell is 
changing and evolving at an inordinate speed. 
We are always prepared to "turn on a dime" and, 
because of our size and dedicated faculty and 
staff, we are able to successfully manage this 
change. In fact, could graduate school be in our 
future? 

At this time of introspection, as we plan 
to celebrate a wonderful milestone in the history 
of Lasell, two things are certain — we are rich in 
history and well positioned for the future. I think 
Edward Lasell would be proud. ^ 

Sincerely, 

Thomas E.J. de Witt, Ph.D. 



New Members Elected to Lasell Boards 



wo NEW MEMBERS WERE ELECTED TO LASELL'S BOARD OF TRUSTEES AT THE JANUARY 
2000 meeting. Lasell is honored to welcome the following individuals to their leadership positions: 



TRUSTEES 

Dr. Alan H. Robbins: Currently President of 
the New England Baptist Hospital, Dr. Robbins is 
a graduate of Dartmouth College and Tufts 
University School of Medicine. Dr. Robbins also 
serves on the Board of Directors of the National 
Neurofibromatosis Foundation and the 
Dartmouth Partners in Community Service. Dr. 
Robbins Uves in Newton Centre with his wife 
Jerye-Ann. 

Mr. Erik J. Stapper: A partner in the law firm 
of Stapper & Van Doren, Mr. Stapper graduated 
from Harvard College and Uiuversity of Michigan 
Law School. In addition to serving as trustee for a 
niimber of charitable foundations, Mr. Stapper is 
an active member of the Art Law Committee of 
the Association of the Bar of the City of New 
York, the International Academy of Estate and 
Trust Law, and the International Fiscal 
Association, among others. 

A resident of New York City, Mr. Stapper and his 
wife, Antoinette Ruinen Stapper '56, a Lasell 
College Overseer, will retire to Lasell Village. 

OVERSEERS 

To complement its governing Board of 
Trustees, Lasell College established the Board of 



Overseers in August 1991. Its members act as 
College emissaries among their peers and the 
community at large. With 45 overseers, both 
alumni and non-alumni, the Board of Trustees is 
pleased to announce the following new members, 
recently elected for a three-year renewable term: 

Gloria Boyd Major-Brown '44, elected in 
October 1999, is a graduate of Lasell and contin- 
ued her education at Barnard College. A success- 
ful real estate agent and active community volun- 
teer, she lives in New Canaan, Connecticut. 

Robert U. Johnsen, elected in October 1999, 
is the retired President of East Insurance Agency, 
Inc. of Burlington, Massachusetts, and a graduate 
of University of North Carolina. The Johnsen fam- 
ily established the EUzabeth E. Groth Johnsen '45 
Endowed Scholarship Fund in memory of his 
wife Elizabeth. Mr. Johnsen resides in Lincoln, 
Massachusetts and Naples, Florida. 

Rudy Kraft, elected in October 1999, graduat- 
ed from the General Motors Institute of 
Technology in 1956, was owner of a Mercedes 
dealership and Vice President for Mercedes 
America. Now retired, he lives in Florida with his 
wife Peggy Schwingel Kraft '56, who is a member 
of the LaseU Board of Trustees and Co-Chair of 
the Lasell 150 Campaign. 



D wight Massey, elected in October 1999, is a 
financial consultant and part owner of Murphy 
Capital Management, and was with Czarnikow- 
Ronda Company, Inc. for more than 30 years. 
Mr. Massey graduated from Stevens Institute of 
Technology, and received an M.B.A. from New 
York Uiuversity. Mr. Massey's wife, Jo- Ann Vojir 
Massey '51, also serves as an Overseer for Lasell. 
They divide their time between homes in New 
Jersey and Florida. 

Robin Parry, elected in October 1999, has 
more than 20 years of consulting and manage- 
ment experience. Ms. Parry received her B.A. 
from University of CaUfornia, Santa Barbara, 
and an M.B.A. from Simmons College Graduate 
School of Management. She is currently pursuing 
a Ph.D. in organizational development from the 
Peter F. Drucker Management Center, Claremont 
Graduate School, in California. 

Duane (Joe) V. Wedeman, elected in January 
2000, is currently a trustee of RGM Trust. He 
attended Howard Payne College and served in 
the United States Marine Corps. Mr. Wedeman 
and his wife, Harriet (Honey) Markham 
Wedeman '48, also a member of LaseU's Board of 
Overseers, make their home in Honolulu, Hawaii. 
Their granddaughter, Manu McNamarra '03 is 
presently a student at LaseU. ^ 



A LASELL LEAVES 



SPRING 2000 



PACKARD GRANTS 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

With technology becoming more widely used 
in the classroom, it is not siirprising that two 
Lasell College faculty members, Shirley GaUerani 
'53 and E>iane Dednah, have embraced this new 
trend. Independently, the two faculty members 
plan to use recently awarded grant funds to 
create multimedia presentations that further 
the study of each of their academic disciplines. 

Shirley GaUerani, assistant professor and 
director of Lasell College's nationally accredited 
Holway Child Study Centers, and Diane Dednah, 
academic coordinator of clinical education for the 
School of Allied Health, were recently awarded 
grants from the Richard C. Packard Fvmd. 

Estabhshed in 1972 in honor of Dr. Packard, 
chairman of Lasell' s History Department from 



1948-1972, The Richard C. Packard Fund provides 
monies to faculty members to pursue projects that 
enhance their professional career to the benefit of 
Lasell. Professor GaUerani plans to develop a mul- 
timedia presentation that Ulustrates the evidence 
of Multiple InteUigences (MI) theory in the class- 
room, while Professor Dednah will use the grant 
to develop a multimedia teaching tool that inte- 
grates the principles of instructional design. 

By using technology to develop a medium to 
educate their peers and an instructional aid for 
students, both Professor GaUeraru and Professor 
Dednah wiU greatly enhance the quahty of educa- 
tion at LaseU. »- 



How Two Faculty Are Bringing Technology into the Classroom 




Shirley Gallerani, 
Assistant Professor and 
Director of the Holway 
Child Study Centers 



r y7 strong proponent 
C/X of Multiple 
Intelligences (MI ) theory, 
Shirley Gallerani is con- 
vinced of its intrinsic val- 
ue to the teaching 
process. "MI is not a 
recipe for teaching; it 
transcends aU the teach- 
ing fads," she empha- 
sizes. 'It doesn't diminish 
the necessity for 
academics — all these 

measures are important. The MI focus starts before 
the testing begins." 

Dr. Howard Gardner, professor of Education 
at Harvard Uruversity, is considered the father of 
the Multiple Intelligences theory. Dr. Gardner the- 
orized that beyond the two commonly used mea- 
sures of human intelligence, verbal/Unguistic and 
logjcal/matfiematical, there are at least seven oth- 
er identifiable types of intelligence. As defined by 
Dr. Gardner, they are bodily/kinesthetic, 
visual/spatial, musical/rhythmic, interpersonal, 
intrapersoiwl, and naturalist. "Every person mani- 
fests a imique mix of these intelligences," explains 
Professor Gallerani. "In practice, a teacher can then 
foster a learning environment that best suits the 
student's blend of uiteUigences." 

With the intention of reaching a national 
audience. Professor Gallerani believes, "a multi- 
media presentation is a very effective approach 
to educating teaching professionals, parents, and 
college students about Multiple Intelligences 
theory. A slide presentation that captures the 
moment when a child deaxly exhibits a type of MI 
in a classroom setting will be very compelling." 

In addition to the Packard grant. Professor 
GaUerani received a third-year grant from the 
Frances R Dewing Foimdation. "The additional 
fundii\g has secured needed growth and progres- 
sion to this project. We had a great start, now 
we're prepared to take it a step further," Professor 
Gallerani explained. 

In 1995, Professor GaUerani was awarded an 
initial grant from the Dewing Foundation. Bring- 
ing in outside consioltants to f adUtate the process, 
the goal was to integrate the MI theory into the 
classroom. 

Professor GaUerani wiU also use her grant to 
attend the National Association for the Education 
of Yoimg ChUdren conference to speak on and 
explore more about Multiple Intelligences theory 
in the classroom. 




Diane Dednah, Academic 
Coordinator of Clinical 
Education for the School 
of Allied Health 



(^~r\ iane Dednah, 

^^' academic coordi- 
nator of chnical educa- 
tion, will use her grant 
to develop a multi- 
media teaching tool 
based on instructional 
design theory to benefit 
the PTA program. 

Currently studying 
instructional design at 
Middlesex Community 
College, Professor 

Dednah recognized the opporttinity to apply 
this theory to improve learning in the PTA pro- 
gram. "My intention is to better bridge how the 
student applies what is learned in the class to 
the clinical practice," she says. 

Instructional design (ID) theory argues that 
learning best takes place when the course of 
instruction is carefuUy plaimed to support the 
outcome. "Instructional design," notes Professor 
Dednah, "studies the flow of information 
imparted to the students, from identifying 
instructional goals, developing assessment 
tools, to evaluating what has been effective in 
educating the student, and then responding to 
the strengths and weaknesses of the class." 
Designed to ensure the quality of instruction, 
ID focuses on analyzing the process of leanung 
needs and goals and then developing a delivery 
system to meet those needs. It includes develop- 
ment of instructional materials and activities, 
and an evaluation of each aspect of the process. 

The Packard grant wUl aUow Professor 
Dednah to create a teaching tool to prepare stu- 
dents to evaluate patients in a clinical environ- 
ment. She goes on to say, "I am interested in 
developing a learning guide using technology in 
CD-ROM format, that depicts interaction and 
in situations that a student is likely to encoimter 
in a clinical setting. The outcome, of course, is 
to develop and improve our students' patient 
skiUs." 

The state of the health care industry pertain- 
ing to PTA, she beUeves is, "that whUe there are 
always changes in health care needs and deHvery 
of patient services, I have a very optimistic fore- 
cast for the clinical and allied health graduates 



« 




Aimee Abdallah '00 



Aimee Abdallah '00 
Represents Lasell at 
Poetry Festival ^ 

//TAT 1 

S RITING IS MY PASSION. 

^: I am a business major in the body of 
I an English major," says recent graduate 

I Aimee Abdallah '00. She was Lasell's 
.representative at the Greater Boston 
Intercollegiate Poetry Festival held on 
April 20th at University of 
Massachusetts / Lowell. 

^ The young poef s 
Uterary work was 
selected by Dr. 
Stephanie Athey, 
assistant 

f professor of English, 
to be read at the fes- 
tival along with 

* peers from 20 other 
area coUeges. 

"I was seated 
between students from Harvard and Lesley," 
says AbdaUah. "To hear so many other 
students who love to write and do it so 
well was really a wonderful experience." 

AbdaUah's future plans include returning 
to her hometown of Londonderry, New 
Hampshire, and pursuing a career in pubUc 
relations. 

Our Legacy 

© Aimee AbdaUah 

Before Pomp and Circumstance plays. 
Before that final processional. 
There is a moment. 
A moment during the preparations. 
Last adjustments of gowns and tassels 
Seem to pause. 

And we stop. 

We ttim and face our past. 

Gazing at those who touched our Uves 

over four years. 

We remember orientation. 

Our first nights with new roommates. 

Our first coUege or frat parties. 

First trip into the city, last minute papers. 

Hospital trips and Riverday Races. 

The nights of heartbreaking loneliness 

The service work and the conflicts. 

AU the memories that never make it 

into the yearbook. 

The laughter and tears 
That occurred when no one 
thought to grab a camera. 

We sigh and hold back the tears 

As we embrace those who bear witness 

to our coUege experience. 

As we line up, the music begins. 

We take a deep breath and the first steps 

toward our future. 



SPRING 2000 



LASELL LEAVES 



3 



/. 



Lasell Campus 2000 Photo Essay Project 



A DAY IN THE LIFE OF LASEIL STUDENTS 



A. 



.S ALUMNI, FRIENDS, PARENTS, AND FACULTY READ LEAVES, THEY OFTEN 
think back on their own years in college. 



With coed dorms, computers in the class- 
room, rooms equipped with telephones and voice- 
mail, Internet hook-ups, and so much freedom, it 
is natural for them to consider how much coUege 
life has changed from when they were students. 

But, has the essence of the coUege experience 
at Lasell really changed? 

Four students, selected by the Student Affairs 
Office as reflective of the cross section of young 
adults who attend Lasell, participated in the 
special. Leaves-inspired Campus 2000 Photo Essay 
project. 

Armed with disposable cameras, along with 
a few basic directions, and a 48-hour timeframe, 
the four students captured their own perspectives 
of the Lasell College experience through the 
camera lens. 

After the film was developed, photos cri- 
tiqued, selected, discussed, and captioned, what 
surfaced among the participants was a feeling of 
camaraderie, commitment, challenge, optimism, 
humor, and pride in the institution. Perhaps the 
trappings have changed, but at its core, the Lasell 
experience remains much the same. 



STUDENT PARTICIPANT PROFILES 

• Chris Hufnagel '02, Business Administration 
major, varsity men's volleyball. Woodland 
Community Council, Co-President Association 
of Business Students, Honor Roll, Orientation 
Leader, Student Athletic Advisory Committee, 
work/ study as intramural monitor. 
Littleton, Massachusetts 

• Brittany Jackson '01, Human Services major. 
Resident Assistant, Treasurer of Campus 
Activity Board. 

Mattapoisett, Massachusetts 

• Mike Norton '03, major undecided, varsity 
lacrosse. Student/ Athlete Honor RoU, Emerging 
Leaders program. Student/ Athlete Advisory 
Council, work/ study in admissions. 

Cape Elizabeth, Maine 

• Nikki Sweeten '03, Human Services 
major. High Honors, work/ study in 
Lnstitutional Advancement. 
Hamden, Connecticut ^ 




^^i__Kns«naKate ^^^^ e've 



been 



ontbs < 



rrssr--"'""""'" 








stretch 



^!!!::3^^:iir:i.."-->-'^'" 



Brittany - ' e conununity «^ 



^e've conve i 

Mtj^students, selected by the Stt 
W^irs Office as reflective o) 
sSmtlmStiia^^adii Up ivho #^| 





Brittany — The Dining Room 

"Friends hanging at lunch. It's time to socialize and make plans. The cafeteria 

really is a festive place." 



4 



LASELL LEAVES 



SPRING 2000 



l« M I H U _l l« U U U 




^tittany- Waiting for Class 

"Between classes there are a fo«, ™ 

friends, and prepare f ^rTo.:/:::^.??'^?/^ '» «!«' -7 W to 



: your next class." 



Chris — BUS 240 Collaborative Practicum 

"My debate team — if s a great group. Lasell requires lots 
of group study and project work — it builds character. You 
have to learn to work well with others." 



fT Mike Starr's Room „• . ,oom aiis"^* 




"He's working with the Uttle kias. 
it really works." 




Mike -Ordway House 
"This is where I Uvp t*^ a • 

P™»y S..U, Plai. wiilESaf ""-"■■ • ""' «■' "" " 

® *^>ly - more so than dorm life.' 




Mike F 

'' »^elJ STel^P°^i«y to develon 

^^-•«8 to work w^rt- ^-''ership ski,, 




Mike — Lacrosse 



"I've played sports all my life, and to play lacrosse in 
college is great. If s a real commitment, but being a part 
of a growing program is exciting." 



-VOT-n »>"«' 'r./e, dio.er .sp«.a»y- 








Nikki — .4 Typical Class 

"The small class size gives students the chance to bond with their professors on a 

more personal level." 



^m^^tm'^^m 



SPRING 2000 



LASELL LEAVES 5 




Noel R. Alexis, assis- 
tant professor and chair 
of the Management 
Information Systems 
Department (MIS), became 
a member of the New York 
Academy of Sciences in 
November, 1999. Founded 
in 1817, the New York 
Academy of Sciences is the 
third oldest scientific organization in America. 
The Academy is an independent, nonprofit orga- 
nization with nearly 50,000 members in more 
than 160 countries united by a commitment to 
promoting science and technology and their 
essential roles in fostering social and economic 
development. 

»*■ 

Assistant Professor Stephanie Athey, 
Ph.D., who teaches writing and Uterature in the 
Humanities Department, will see her research on 
the connections between the early eugenics move- 
ment and the development of American feminism 
pubUshed online this spring. "Eugenic Feminisms 
in Late Nineteenth-Century America: Reading 
Race in Victoria Woodhull, Frances Willard, 
Anna Juha Cooper and Ida B. WeUs" will 
appear in the spring issue of GENDERS at 
http: / / www.genders.org. 

This refereed journal has been publishing for 
13 years and has moved completely to the 
Internet oiUy in the last two years. 

Richard Bath, assistant 
professor and chair of 
the Fashion and Design 
program, and faculty, Jill 
Carey, Joan Morris, Jay 
Calderin, Andy Chan, 
Sandy Newman, Misha 
Lenn, Sarah Scavone, and 
Kay Thread "are always 
looking for new ways to 
keep fresh and involved, whether it be in acade- 
mics, business or the conununity,"says Bath. 

As a resiilt, the program faculty and students 
have a number of interesting "connected learning" 
projects with which they are involved this semes- 
ter. The most ambitious, for the second year in a 
row, is undertaking the organization of the Second 
Annual Humanitarian Awards Night for the 
David John Louison Center, a local homeless chil- 
dren's shelter. The evening will include a formal 
sit down dinner, fashion show, and award cere- 
mony. This project is the responsibility of the 
senior class who will work with a committee of 
the voltmteers from the Center. Noted couturier, 
David Josef, wQl feature his fashion designs, and 
various local dignitaries wiU be in attendance. Last 
year's event raised some $12,000 for the Center. 

Lucia Darling has 

been appointed director of 
Student Financial Planning 
for the College. "I think 
LaseU has a great aid pro- 
gram," says Ms. Darling, 
"and I look forward to 
helping students and their 
families utilize the avaU- 



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able resources." A graduate of Mount Ida College, 
Ms. Darling was director of financial aid at Mount 
Ida since 1997 and, before that, was assistant 
director of financial aid at Brandeis University. 

Director of Student Activities, Kim Eldred, 
co-presented a session with Jerry Dumais '02, 
vice president for Academic Affairs for Student 
Government, at the National Association of 
Campus Activities (NACA) Regional Conference, 
held in Manchester, NH, in November. The 
session was titled, "Making Your SGA an 
Effective Student Organization." Diane Austin, 
dean of Student Affairs, presented a two-hour, 
pre-conference session titled, "The First Year 
Experience: The Cornerstone of Collegiate 
Success." 

Kim Farah, associate professor and chair of 
the Department of Exercise Science, who teaches 
Chemistry /Exercise Science, and former Lasell 
faculty, Kerrissa Heff eman (presently at Brown 
University), recently had a chapter accepted in the 
American Association of Higher Education's 
(AAHE) monograph series in Service Learning 
across the disciplines. The chapter wiU be a part 
of the volume in the women's studies and service 
learning monograph. Heffernan and Farah's 
chapter titled, "The Urban Educational Initiative: 
Outsiders in the Discipline," offers an example of 
pedagogy in service to a community of women. 
The work was partially fimded through a grant 
provided by the State Street Foundation. 

Kathy Urner, director 
of Campaign and Gift 
Planning, is pleased to 
announce that Ginny 
Ireland recently accepted 
the position of Major Gifts 
Officer in the office of 
Institutional 

Advancement. "I'm look- 
ing forward to the chal- 
lenge of educating prospective donors about all 
the remarkable things that are going on at LaseU," 
says Ireland enthusiastically, "motivating them to 
invest in the mission in very meaningful ways." 

Before her appointment at Lasell, Ireland 
served in the Museum of Science development 
office. An education major, Ireland earned her 
undergraduate degree from Southern Methodist 
University in Dallas, and a Master's degree in 
education from National Lewis Uiuversity in 
Evanston, Illinois. "This opportunity brings 
together my twin passions: education and devel- 
opment," and, as Ireland goes on to say, "when 
you believe in the mission from head to toe, you 
can effectively ask others to invest. I am so 
impressed with LaseU' s innovative spirit and 
commitment to providing a quality college expe- 
rience." 

She won! Part-time Psychology instructor, 
Nancy Levine, was elected to the Newton School 
Committee to serve for a one-year term. She is 
also actively involved on the oversight committee 
of Newton Serves: BuUding Community Through 



Service, a project of the Newton 2000 effort to pro- 
vide a day-long community service "serve-a- 
thon" this spring, and to raise funds to endow an 
Office for Community Service in Newton. 




i*. 



Sodexho-Marriott's Maryanne Conroy- 
Miller, general manager of the diiung haU, 
thinks a lot of LaseU graduates. In fact, she's 
such a fan that she's hired several who have 
worked for her during their undergraduate 
years, to help ensure the highest level of food 
service to the Lasell conununity. 

Since shortly after graduation. Dee 
Nedder '98, a human services major who 
graduated with a 3.7 grade point average, 
has been working in the dining hall in a 
variety of production and service jobs. Last 
December Nedder was promoted to a newly 
created job of dining room supervisor, where 
she is responsible for the day-to-day opera- 
tion and service. Among her accompUsh- 
ments already: working on formal training 
standards and hiring new staff. 

Patti Beck '97, fashion merchandising, 
rejoined Sodexho-Marriott on a fuU-time 
basis in January after she left briefly to pur- 
sue other opportunities. Now she is back as 
the retail and marketing supervisor for din- 
ing services. Her duties include supervising 
and revitalizing Eddie's, assisting and even- 
tuaUy booking catering, and most important- 
ly, helping to execute a marketing plan for 
an expanding coUege population. 

Dorrie Richardson '99, a hotel and travel 
administration major, has rejoined Sodexho- 
Marriott services as a "general culinarian," 
lending her skUl and personality to special 
projects including workplace safety and 
HACCP ti-aining. 

All of them join the dining haU's first 
alumna employee, Jean Petrino '97, a busi- 
ness administration major, who nms the 
office and office systems, and keeps track of 
the general manager with great skUl and a 
great sense of humor. 



Joan WeUer Amow Professor Sylvia 
MacPhee, Ph.D., who teaches Sociology in the 
Department of Social Science, presented a paper 
titled, "A New Approach to Teaching About Race 
and Ethnicity," at the New England Sociological 
Association (NESA) FaU 1999 Conference last 
November at Northeastern University. The theme 
of the conference was 'The Sociology of Hate," 
and included sessions on "Understanding Hate: 
Race, Ethnicity, and Subculture," "Culture and 
Identity," "Commvmity and CivU Society," and 
"Teaching Issues." Dr. MacPhee has been on the 
Lasell faculty since 1979. 



LASELL LEAVES 



SPRING 2000 



w 



i 



m 





Kathleen O'Connor, 

who was promoted to vice 
president for Enrollment 
Management in October, is 
finding little free time these 
days. In addition to her 
Lasell responsibilities, she 
is hitting the books and 
getting the student per- 
spective as she pursues her 
doctorate in Higher Education Administration 
from the University of Massachusetts/Boston. 

Paula Panchuck, Ph.D., dean of LaseU Village, 
presented a session about the learning program at 
Lasell Village entitled, "Learning in all Places: 
Models for Senior Education," at the American 
Society on Aging's 46th Annual Meeting in March, 
in San Diego. 

Dianne Polizzi has 

been appointed registrar 
in the Office of Enrollment 
Management. Bringing 14 
years of experience in 
enrollment management to 
the CoUege, Ms. Polizzi 
most recently served as 
registrar for Emmanuel 
College and prior to that, 
served as registrar for New England Baptist 
Hospital School of Ntirsing. Ms. Polizzi received 
her Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology with 
distinction in the field, from Emmanuel College 
and went on to earn a Master's of Education in 
Administration, Plarining, and Social Policy from 
Harvard University School of Education. "I am 
happy to be a member of the LaseU community," 
says Ms. Pohzzi, "and hope to make a positive 
contribution to the academic growth of the 
College." ^ 

The new assistant reg- 
istiar, Greer Golding, 
brings substantial adminis- 
tiative skiUs and related 
experience to her new role. 
Ms. Golding comes to 
LaseU from New England 
College of Optometry 
where she worked in the 
registiar's office, and the 
Brigham and Women's Hospital, where she 
served in administiation for seven years. 

Professor of Humanities, Anne Tagge, pre- 
sented a paper at the Jane Austen Society of 
North America's annual general meeting in 
Colorado Springs, titled, "The Conquer'd Hero: 
T married her because they asked me to do it. . .'" 
She also wrote, "Riding a Natural Treasure in 
Costa Rica," which was published February 13, 
2000 in the Boston Globe. 




Join Those Were the Days 
Memories Project 



EDITOR'S NOTE: Your words and recollections 
can help us chronicle Lasell's unique history. 
Please send us anecdotes about classmates, 
faculty, staff, and experiences that made your 
years at Lasell special. If you are connected to 
the Web, key in http://delphi.comyiaselI and 
send us your reminiscences online. 




L AS EL L 

C 0,,JLss*l. E G E 



Memory of Lasell 

MANNERS AND CONVERSATION 

Submitted by Pauline LeClaire Reiter '27 

The campus of LaseU was located in a quiet and beautiful suburb of Boston. The 
narrow streets were lined with magnificent old shade trees, and the houses, well 
provided with shrubbery and flowers, were either Colonial or Victorian. Auburndale 
was just an ideal setting for a "Young Ladies Seminary," which indeed it was. 

When I entered Lasell in 1926, it had attained the rating of a junior college with 
a predominately college curriculum, but it still carried a few of the old courses to 
"benefit the young ladies." We juniors were required to take those courses, and the 
seniors made a lot of fun of us. But looking back, I can see the wisdom of many of 
the rules. For example, a cardinal rule for the dining room was for the diners to be 
seated from the left side with the server serving from the right. Thus confusion was 
avoided. 

The lessons on table settings and the proper use of table silver provoked a good 
deal of merriment, since most of these rules were part of the upbringing of the girls. 
Another course was on "conversation." We were urged never to let religion or 
politics get into our discussion. There are many pitfalls in a conversation, but 
with a little tact they could be avoided. 

These courses were held in a large formal parlor in Bragdon and we were 
required to attend dressed in our best. As we arrived we were put through a series of 
introductions. By the end of the course we were expected to be letter perfect in this 
amenity. 

My memory has probably changed over the years, but perhaps some other 
members of my class could correct or add to them. It was an interesting time at 
the school. Not the least interesting of which was our instructor — a wonderful 
lady named Lily Rose Potter. She had infinite patience with us. I hope our future 
conduct rewarded that patience. 

Sincerely, 

Pauline LeClaire Reiter '27 



SPRING 2000 



LASELL LEAVES 



Lasell Earns 
Candidaq^ Status 
for New Program 
in Athletic Training 

J\ RTURO U. IRIARTE, PH.D., 
vice president of Academic Affairs, 
announced that the Joint Review 
Committee on Educational Programs 
in Athletic Training (JRC-AT) has 
granted candidacy status to the 
College's new program in Athletic 
Trairiing. 

By policy, Lasell is now permitted to 
make public that candidacy status has been 
granted to the program. "This is the first step 
in seeking accreditation — and a significant 
one," Dr. Iriarte explains. "1 congratulate all 
those who so diligently worked toward this 
goal, with special thariks to Bill Nowlan, 
M.Ed., LATC, CSCS — assistant professor for 
the Exercise Science department and coordi- 
nator of athletic training — for his leadership 
and hard work, and to Lisa Harris — associ- 
ate dean of the School of Allied Health — for 
her constant support and work. " 

The College was also recently informed 
by the Massachusetts Department of Higher 
Education that degree-granting authority has 
been given to the new Athletic Training pro- 
gram. The College can now begin to award a 
Bachelor's degree in Athletic Training. ^*- 

Athletes Get 
Involved 

IRECTOR OF ATHLETICS, 
Kristy Walter, her coaches, and ath- 
letes, have been putting the emphasis 
on community service recently. 

"Ctirrently, the field hockey team is partici- 
pating in a program called "sports pals," in 
which they correspond weekly through email 
or postal mail with girls in fourth and fifth 
grade about school, sports, and Hfe in general. 
All of the Lasell student/athletes involved 
were reqiiired to go through special training 
for this program. 

Additionally, the Athletics Program has 
twice hosted a group of special needs adults 
from Waltham. to home games. The group 
came to a women's volleyball game in October, 
and then to both a men's and women's basket- 
ball game in January. After the games, the 
teams mingled with the group, introduced 
themselves, and shared refreshments. >*- 




Lasell Village Nears Completion 

PIONEERING PROJECT PROVIDES HISTORICAL LINKS 

HE PICTURESQUE CLOCK TOWER AT LASELL VILLAGE NOW RISES ABOVE ITS 
pond and walkw^ays w^elcoming residents and visitors to one of the most dramatic endeavors 
in Lasell College's history. 

The completion of the Village 
marks many "firsts" both for the 
College and for the lifelong learn- 
ing opportunities available to 
adults of retirement age. The 
Village is Newton's first continu- 
ing care retirement community 
(CCRC), which offers residents 
access to an array of lifestyle and 
health care services, under the 
direction of Executive Director Jim 
Wingardner. 

Although Lasell Village is 
among a growing number of col- 
lege-affiliated retirement communities in the 
country, it is the first to feature a formal, individu- 
alized, required continuing education program for 
its residents. A unique feature of each Village 
building is the inclusion of a classroom, fitness 
facility or studio devoted to the integration of 
intellectual growth, creative development, and 
physical wellness. In addition, Lasell College is 
the first to appoint a full-time dean. Dr. Paula 
Panchuck, to oversee this unique living and learn- 
ing program at Lasell Village. 

Along with its trailblazing nature, however, 
the Village has probed the rich history of both its 
location and its educational mission. This is par- 
ticularly evident in the recent naming of Village 
buildings and living areas. Each of the thirteen 
main residences is named for a pioneer in the his- 
tory of education. They include French psycholo- 
gist Alfred Binet, learning taxonomy specialist 
Benjamin Bloom, "learning by doing" advocate 
John Dewey, German pedagogues Friedrich 
Froebel and Henriette Goldschmidt, Brazilian 
educator Paulo Freire, public school leader 
Horace Mann, early childhood specialist Maria 
Montessori, Summerhill learning community 



The stately Lasell Village clock tower serves as a stunning visual accent 
and directional marker on the canipus of the unique continuing care 
retirement community. 



founder, A.S. Neill, Swiss educators Johann 
Pestalozzi and Jean Piaget, experiential learning 
advocate Carl Rogers, and African- American edu- 
cator Booker T. Washington. 

Nineteenth century history wiU come alive as 
Village residents sample the fare in the dining 
rooms in the Town Hall. The largest dining area. 
The Norumbega Room, recalls the popular recre- 
ation area on the banks of the Charles River that 
was devastated by fire in the 1960s. The smallest 
dining area, the Auburndale Room, is a tribute to 
the historic Newton Village in which both Lasell 
College and Lasell Village are located. A third 
dining room, The Woodland Park Grille, is remi- 
niscent of Newton's Woodland Park Hotel, once 
situated along Washington Street between Aspen 
and Woodland Roads. LaseU Seminary (now 
Lasell College) purchased the hotel in 1919 to use 
as a dormitory for its students and as classrooms 
for children in the lower grades of the Woodland 
Park School. 

With its superb blend of history, hospitality, 
and educational programming, Lasell Village 
opened in May 2000. For more information, please 
caU 617-243-2323. >*■ 



Wass Gets Face Lift OTA Hosts Speaker 



HE WASS SCIENCE BUILDING HAS 
had a major face lift. The renovation, which 
involves aU three floors, includes new paint, 
new floor tiles, new lighting, and benches 
for students to sit, relax, and study. 

The first floor is completed, the second 
almost, and the third will be renovated this sum- 
mer. Visitors are welcome, says Gloria Mead, 
coordinator of Allied Health Programs in Wass, 
who has taken it upon herself to compile a some- 
what historical PTA photo book that contains 
pictures chronicling PTA Pinning ceremonies 
and life in the Wass building over the years. ^ 



The President of the American Occupational 
Therapy Association, Dr. Karen Jacobs, presented a 
lecture titled, "Being an Occupational F.A.N.A.T.I.C." 
to students in the Occupational Therapy Associates' 
program last December. The event, which took place 
in the Rosen Auditorium, was "a very memorable 
and entertaining experience for aU students and fac- 
ulty interested in health care, allied health profes- 
sions, or the future of occupational therapy," said 
event host, Michael Roberts, MS, OTR/L, who 
chairs the OTA Program. ** 



tffsi9!ty^v^<tv^^n^ -^i^ft^tm 



("nfc?t-irr„»,T ,--^Uik'"'i^ JIW 



LASELL LEAVES 



SPRING 2000 




f&smL 



Crime Writer Leslie Glass Offers Clues to 
Writing for Students 

Although the attractive, diminutive Leslie glass looks like she might 

be a casual contributor to Ladies Home Journal, she admits to being perfectly comfortable in the 
company of sociopaths and the criminally insane. They are, in fact, her close companions when 
she sits at her computer, weaving delectable detective stories that feature April Woo, a New 
York City Police Department detective, whom she has featured in a series of four novels. The 
author recently visited with LaseU students at a gathering of aspiring writers. 



'1 always knew I wanted to be a novelist — to 
write for a living," Leslie Glass says. Her commit- 
ment to becoming a writer is a testament to dogged 
determination, perseverance, and an imwavering 
devotion to a dream. 

"Write, write, write — take advantage 
of every opportunity to develop your skills," 
Glass counseled an enthusiastic group of 
students who attended her lecture. She spoke 
of her own experience pursuing her dream 
to achieve the rank of novelist. 

Upon graduating from Barnard 
College, Glass couldn't find a job related 
to writing, so she opted for secretarial 
school. Armed with new skiUs that 
allowed her to gain entry, she took a job 
in an advertising agency where she 
worked as a copywriter, writing about 
everything from foot powder to digestive 
aid products. 'To be a writer," Glass main- 
tains, "take whatever job you can get that 
has to do with writing." 

From the advertising agency. Glass 
moved to Bantam Books where she landed 
a job as a book cover writer. "There was 
never any money or glory," she recalls, 
"but step-by-step, 1 was able to hone my 
talents as a writer." 

At trendy New York Magazine, as an office 
assistant, Leslie Glass endured the tediixm in order 
to wrest the chance to write for the magazine on the 
side. 'Tm persistent," Glass confides. "Like my char- 
acter April Woo, I was determined to beat the odds." 

While at New York, she wrote and edited a gossip 
coliunn that competed with the likes of People 




■'ns^ 



Magazine. "It was very stressful, but excellent 
training." 

The experience introduced Leslie Glass to the 
inside workings of the New York Police Department 
and provided the backdrop for her first novel. 
Getting Away with It. "Until that time, I thought 
I was a failtire," says Glass, reflecting on her 
career. "I had worked for 20 years, without 
making any money to speak of. But, then I 

realized I'd been paid to learn and do 
what I love." 

The success of her first novel gave 
her publisher, Doubleday, the impe- 
tus to extend her a three-book deal to 
write about "women in jeopardy." 

Leslie Glass is up to the task. 
She presents her main character, 
April Woo, with astonishingly diffi- 
cult crimes to solve and particularly 
loathsome criminals to track down. 
However, the author can also 
have fun with her characters. 
Sometimes she names them after 
her close friends, like Dr. Arturo 
U. Iriarte, vice president of 
Academic Affairs, whom she has 
cast more than a few times in 
her books. 

"Most of the time — 11 months out of the year 
— I work alone, pretending to be a kiUer or a victim," 
says Glass. "Writing can be grubby, tiring work. 
However, for a month out of a year, my life is very 
glamorous. It is a thrill and a privilege to travel, to go 
to book signings, to spend time on college campuses 
and connect with young writers." ^ 




Lasell Web Site Has a New Look 



LiASI 



JELL'S INTERNET PRESENCE HAS A SPIFFY NEW LOOK FEATURING A 
more streamhned navigation system and all the news and information about the 
College that you like to see. Go visit at http://www.lasell.edu. 

Also, coming soon, LaseU 
College will take its sesquicen- 
termial celebration online with 
a Web site devoted entirely to 
news and information about 
the upcoming celebration. Check 
it out at www.lasell-150.org. 
Please excuse the cyberdust, this 
site is still under construction. ^ 




CAMPUS 



Study Abroad 
Program in England 
Launched 



? HIRTEEN LASELL STUDENTS WILL 
board a Continental airline jet on June 24, 
2000 and fly to Lancaster, England for a 
two- week study abroad program. 

In December, Arturo U. Iriarte, vice president 
of Academic Affairs, entered into an agreement 
with St. Martin's College, with campuses in 
Ambleside and Lancaster, England to establish a 
two-week summer program for Lasell students. 
St. Martin's College is the biggest provider of 
teacher training in the United Kingdom, although 
the 13 students attending the program are 
enrolled at Lasell in many disciplines. 

The St. Martin's program provides experi- 
enced and highly qualified professors who will 
employ a wide range of activities and compara- 
tive experiences to help Lasell students develop 
and enhance their knowledge of England and its 
educational system. 

"We hope that this is the first of many more 
international learning opportunities for Lasell 
students," said Vice President Iriarte. "In fact, 
we are engaged in conversations with schools in 
Ireland, Australia, and another one in England 
to discuss semester abroad programs." 

Betsey Winter '70, vice president of Finance 
and Administration for Lasell, and her daughter 
E.J., 17, will accompany the student group to 
England. Vice President Winter wiU serve as the 
group's chaperone. "I think that an international 
experience for students is such a wonderful 
learning opportunity — both inside and outside 
of the classroom," said Betsey Winter. "I look for- 
ward to learning a tremendous amount myself." 

The cost of transportation and tuition for 
the "Education Summer School" program is 
approximately $1800 per student. To help 
underwrite some of the cost to the students, the 
Office of Institutional Advancement put out a 
"caU to alumni" on email to identify potential 
sponsors for each student. "1 had a response 30 
seconds after I pushed the send button on the 
computer," said Ruth Shuman, dean for 
Institutional Advancement. "And within two 
weeks we had $500 sponsorships for each 
student." A special thank you goes to Nancy 
Curtis Grellier '49, Anne Wechsler Hiatt '77, 
Lynn Kief er Holt '61, Robert Huntington, Pell 
Kermedy '83, Kathy Morgan Lucey '67, Penny 
DeLaney Ogrinz '38, Antoinette Ruinen 
Stapper '56 and her husband EriJk, and Joan 
Howe Weber '51 for their generosity and for 
making it possible for these Lasell students to 
attend the study abroad program in England. 

We all look forward to hearing from the 
students, (and Betsey Winter and daughter E.J.) 
when they return from their program on 
July 8, 2000.^ 



m 



SPRING 2000 



LASELL LEAVES 



9 



SPORTS NEWS 




Kristy Walter, Director 
of Athletics at Lasell 



Varsity Update 

by Kristy Walter 
Director of Athletics 



Dear Friends: 

The Athletics 
program at Lasell 
College is thriving! 
Now completing the 
second year of active 
NCAA membership 
and coeducational 
sports sponsorship, 
Lasell' s coaches, 
student/athletes, and supporters have 
much of which to be proud. 

Participation is increasing for every 
team, as is the level of competition. There 
are 130 student/athletes this year — a 30% 
increase from last year. With the addition of 
men's volleyball, Lasell now sponsors 11 
varsity teams. We look forward to fielding a 
women's varsity lacrosse team in the spring 
of 2001. 

To date, the Lasers' young teams can 
boast considerable success for the 1999-2000 
season. They have been rvmners-up in four 
of the five North Atlantic Conference cham- 
pionships, six athletes have been named 
players of the week and, many athletes have 
been named to both all-conference and all- 
toumament teams. Women's volleyball, 
women's basketball, men's soccer, and 
women's cross country were runners-up in 
their respective conference championships, 
and the women's softball team will be look- 
ing to bring the first Conference champion- 
ship to Lasell. 

We are most proud that 50 student/ 
athletes achieved the Student/ Athlete 
Honor Roll for the 1999 fall semester. This 
impressive number represents a significant 
increase from last year, when only 26 stu- 
dents qualified. A student must maintain a 
grade point average of 3.0 or higher and 
take 12 credits to be eligible. Women's cross 
country and softbaU lead the varsity teams 
with the highest number of players on the 
Student/ Athlete Honor Roll. 

The spring season saw the men's 
lacrosse team in action on Grellier Field 
and the women's softball team competing 
on Taylor Field. Coaches for both teams are 
relying on experienced returning players 
and looking to talented recruits to con- 
tribute during the season. 

LaseU College is on track to establishing 
itself as a strong competitor regionally and 
soon nationally in NCAA Division III athlet- 
ics. AJl of the coaches have been recruiting 
hard this year to bring in talented athletes to 
supplement the existing talent on campus. 
Next year will see more conference champi- 
oriships, more all-tournament team mem- 
bers, more aU-conference players, and more 
glory for Lasell College teams. »■ 



Fall 1999 -Winter 2000 Season in Review: 



LASELL COLLEGE MEN'S SOCCER - 
OVERALL RECORD: 10-8, 
CONFERENCE RECORD: 3-2 

"I am committed to player development at the 
highest level because we intend to compete at a 
national level," states Head Coach Giovanni 
Pacini. His strategy to bring along talented young 
players is already paying off as the Lasers put 
together a winning record in only their second 
season of NCAA Division 111 play. 

The Lasers faced a higher level of competition 
in the 1999 schedule, facing programs of national 
prominence such as Brandeis, Babson, Wheaton, 
MIT, and Division II opponent Stonehill College. 
Leading the way for the all-sophomore and fresh- 
man team were tri-captains Bryan Silveira of 
Fairhaven, MA, Eric Lewandoski of Horal Park, 
NY, and Brian Smith of We3anouth, MA. With a 
number of returning players and a host of incom- 
ing freshmen, there will be an atmosphere of 
strong competition as players vie for starting posi- 
tions as well as roster spots in the fall. The men's 
soccer program looks forward to building on its 
successful 1999 season in the fall of 2000. 

LASELL COLLEGE WOMEN'S SOCCER - 
OVERALL RECORD: 9-7-1, 
CONFERENCE RECORD: 6-3 




kJ>^: 



Danielle LeBlanc '03 steals ball from Bay Path College 
defender to help achieve a 4-0 win. 

First-year Head Coach Catherine Kidd led her 
team to an impressive overall record of 9-7-1 and 
dropped a close match to Mt. Ida in the semi- 
finals of the North Atlantic Conference 0-1, sub- 
stantially improving upon the 5-11-1 record of 
1998. "I was very pleased with our performance," 
says Coach Kidd. "We doubled our win record 
over the prior year and defeated Becker College 
for the first time." 

A number of talented first year players and 
returning upperclassmen contributed to the suc- 
cessful season. Bianca Vasquez and Lauren 
Polimero earned All-Conference Player honors, 
and Kristin Gould earned a spot on the second 
team. Stephanie Williams earned a spot on the 
AU-Toumament team. "With only one graduation 
loss, a roster of returning talent, and promising 



new recruits," says Coach Kidd, "I'm really look- 
ing forward to building on our success next fall." 

LASELL COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY - 
OVERALL RECORD: 1-10, 
CONFERENCE RECORD: 1-3 

"Wins and losses were not my main objective this 
inaugural year," explains first year Head Coach 
Jessica Cormier. "I am more concerned about 
building a strong foundation of skills and game 
knowledge. The wins will come. These young 
women love to play and want to improve. What 
more could a coach ask for?" The field hockey 
team notched the first win in Lasell College histo- 
ry ever against conference rivals Elms College, 
winning 1-0. 

Indeed the almost entirely freshman team 
has a lot of which to be proud. Goalie Co-Captain 
Tina Odiome (Otter River, MA) earned a spot 
on the North Atlantic All-Conference team, 
Co-Captain Natalie Jablokov (Windmoor, PA) 
also earned an honorable mention on the 
All-Conference team, Christina Strandson 
(Danielson, CT) and Kristina Peres (E. Falmouth, 
MA) were named to the AU-Toumament team in 
Lasell's semi-final loss to Wheelock College in the 
North Atlantic Conference Tournament. With 
enthusiasm and emerging talent. Coach Cormier 
and her squad are looking forward to a successful 
fall season. 

LASELL COLLEGE CROSS COUNTRY 

In only its second year, the men's and women's 
cross country team, coached by Hanna Bruno fin- 
ished the year on a high note with the women 
placing second in the North Atlantic Conference 
finals. Competing in eight meets, all returning 
runners posted better times than last year and 
substantial contributions by first year nmners 
helped the team's overall performance, with 
Melissa Guy, Kiplee Johnson, Kim Smith, and 
Daniel Hogan named to the All-Tournament 
team. On the strength of such a strong showing. 
Coach Bruno feels there is more success in the 
future for her program. 

WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL - 
OVERALL RECORD: 21-8, 
CONFERENCE RECORD: 6-2 

Head Coach Mary Tom had high expectations for 
the 1999 women's voUeybaU season, and the team 
responded by turning in an impressive 22-8 
record, while competing for the first time in the 
North Atlantic Conference. Coach Tom then 
raised the stakes, challenging the team to win the 
first Conference championship. Well, the Lasers 
came very close, finishing as the ruimers-up in the 
NAC. 

Captain setter Melissa Wilson joined outside 
hitters Tania Cirino, Sara Quinones, and middle 
hitter Janet Jennings as returning starting players. 
The rest of the starting lineup included first-year 
players Sara Wolfgang, Anna Long, and 
Stephanie Mitchell. Anastasia Kasseris also 
saw playing time this year. Melissa Wilson and 
Janet Jennings were named to the NAC All- 
Tournament Team, both having very strong play- 
off performances. 



IC 



LASELL LEAVES 



SPRING 2000 



SPORTS NEWS 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL - 
OVERALL RECORD: 10-16, 
CONFERENCE RECORD: 9-6 

"I am very pleased with the progress this young 
team made this season," says Head Coach Tracey 
Downs, "and we are optimistic about becoming 
an even stronger competitor next year." The 
women's basketball team finished second in the 
North Atlantic Conference regular season with 
a 9-6 conference record, that sent them to the 
season-end tournament. 

The Conference championship was held at 
Maine Maritime Academy. In the semi-final 
game, the Lasers defeated Lesley CoUege 60-55 
behind the scoring of Jen Lesnick and Tricia 
Sylvester, who each had 17 points. In the champi- 
onship game, LaseU rallied in the second half, but 
could not fend off the defensive pressure of the 
Maine Mariners and dropped the game 58-53. 
Monica Sheppard led the team with 14 points 
and nine rebounds. Jen Lesnick (North Branford, 
CT) and Tricia Sylvester (Winslow, ME) were 
named to the All-Tournament Team. 

"With the addition of a few talented recruits 
to round out this young team next year," con- 
cludes Coach Downes, "Lasell looks to bring the 
North Atlantic Conference Championship back 
to Massachusetts." 

MEN'S BASKETBALL- 
OVERALL RECORD: 12-13, 
CONFERENCE RECORD: 4^ 

Led by Head Coach Michael Catapano and 
Assistant Coach Chris Harvey, the men's basket- 
ball team finished the year with an impressive 
12-13 overall record, with their conference record 
good enough to earn a berth in the NAC 
Tournament. In tournament play, the men lost a 
double over-time game to Maine Maritime in the 
semi-finals of the Championship. Sterling 
Bishop led the team in this 96-94 loss with 16 
points and 12 rebounds. Oral Francis put in 
19 points for the Lasers including three three- 
pointers late in the game. 

The Lasers are losing four key players next 
year as Bishop, Francis, Pierre Francois, and 
Derrick Winston have completed their eligibility. 
However, the coaches expect a talented and tall 
recruiting class will help fill the void, as the 
Lasers intend to compete for the North Atlantic 
Corvference Championship next year. 

MEN'S VOLLEYBALL - 
OVERALL RECORD: 3-11 

LaseU CoUege men's voUeybaU team has com- 
pleted its first season of NCAA Division III com- 
petition. Led by Head Coach James McDermott, 
the young team, comprised entirely of freshmen 
and sophomores, completed a 16-game schedule 
against teams in the New England region. The 
men won their first match on February 16 against 
Newbury College. The team will be under the 
direction of a new head coach next season as 
Coach McDermott is leaving to attend graduate 
school. Athletic Director Kristy Walter expects all 
of this year's players to return and is looking for- 
ward to adding some talented recruits to the ros- 
ter next year. **■ 



Female Student/Athletes Serve as 
Role Models for the Girl Scouts 

It was the SLEEPOVER to beat all SLEEPOVERS. on FEBRUARY 11, 
50 Girl Scouts from the Patriot Trail Girl Scout Council joined a number of 
Lasell's female student/athletes and coaches for the first annual Sports 
Overnight in celebration of National Girls and Women in Sports Day. 




Girls from the Patriot Girl Scout Council and Lasell female student/athletes and coaches take time out 
from the festivities to pose for a group shot at the 1st annual Sports Overnight at Lasell College. 



Hosted by the LaseU CoUege Athletic 
Department, the participants convened in the g)nn- 
nasium for an afternoon and night of sports clinics, 
movies, snacks, and comraderie. 

"The Girl Scouts were introduced to new 
sports, learned some new skills, but most impor- 
tantly, saw women student/athletes as positive 
role models," explained Kristy Walter, director of 
Athletics. 

Starting in the afternoon. Girl Scouts participat- 
ed in clinics run by student/athletes and coaches, 
representing four of the varsity women's teams: 
basketbaU, soccer, softbaU, and field hockey. The 
girls, ranging from nine- to 11 -years-old, worked 
on their free-throws, dribbled soccer balls, perfect- 
ed their batting stance, and were introduced to field 
hockey. "The drills were conducted so that each 
Girl Scout had the opportunity to try each sport," 
says Walters. "And our students reaUy loved being 
the leaders — being the coach for a day." 

After dinner, the Girl Scouts, troop leaders, 
athletic department staff, and student/athletes 
watched A League of Their Own, the inspirational 
basebaU movie. Then they aU rolled out sleeping 



STUDENT/ATHLETE HONOR ROLL 



bags for the sleepover in the gym. On the foUow- 
ing day, the Girl Scouts were treated to breakfast 
and lunch in the dining hall, and were invited to 
stay for the women's basketball game on Satiirday 
afternoon. 

"It was a wonderfully upUfting experience 
for aU the participants. And seeing our student/ 
athletes using their talent and knowledge to influ- 
ence young athletes was particularly gratifying," 
Kristy Walter reports. ^ 




Lasell basketball player coaches an aspiring young athlete 
at the 1st annual Sports Overnight. 



The dual demands of coUegiate level athletic competition and a rigorous academic program requires 
exceptional focus and commitment on the part of the student. LaseU CoUege confers special recogni- 
tion to these exceptional students. The Student/Athlete Honor RoU, requires students to maintain a 
3.0 grade point average or better, earn 12 credits, and be an active student/ athlete. The CoUege com- 
mends the foUowing students who have achieved Student/ Athlete Honor RoU for the faU semester 
1999. Congratulations! 



Aielle, Missy '03 
Beaupre, Matt '03 
Botirbeau, Diana '03 
Cross, Josh '03 
Ehergartner, Alex '03 
Gomez, Ben '02 
Guy, Melissa '01 
Hogan, Daniel '03 
Hutchiiison, Matt '03 
Kelleher, Ryan '03 
LeBlanc, Danielle '03 
Lewandoski, Eric '02 
Lively, Jason '03 
Lord, Katharine '00 



Anctil, Shana '02 
Bishop, Sterling '01 
Carr, Michael '03 
DeFillipo, Wendi '03 
Golden, Matthew '03 
Gooding, Eduardo '02 
Hanely, Katie '03 
Hufnagel, Chris '02 
Johnson, Kipelee '99 
Langelier, Lisa '02 
Lesnick, Jennifer '02 
Lewis, Heidi '01 
Lively, Paul '02 
Marquart, Mark '03 



McCook, Casey '03 
Newton, Doug '03 
Odiome, Tina '03 
Parker, Alexis '03 
Quinones, Sarah '02 
Ramadon, Katie '03 
Roop, Kara '01 
Smith, Brian '02 
Smith, Siobhan '01 
Stanley, Jennifer '03 
Sylvester, Tricia '03 
Vanderwerken, Jarrod '02 
Williams, Stephanie '03 



Mitchell, Stephanie '03 
Norton, Mike '03 
Olson, Rebekah '03 
Polimeno, Lauren '00 
Raneri, Lisa '03 
Rose, Josh '02 
Sheppard Monica '03 
Smith, Kim '03 
Spearman, Oliver '02 
Strandson, Christina '03 
Theberge, Dylan '03 
Valles, Vanessa '03 
Wilson, Melissa '01 



SPRING 2000 



LASELL LEAVES 



11 



tL. 





Nancye Van Deusen Connor 
'57 and her husband, Philip 
Connor 



PROFILE: 

For Connors, 
Philanthropy and 
Retirement Planning 
Go Hand-in-Hand 

OR NANCYE VAN DEUSEN CONNOR 
'57 and her husband, Philip Connor, retire- 
ment planning had equal consideration to 
philanthropy when they decided to make 
a gift to Lasell College in the form of a 
deferred gift annuity. 

Both have very 
strong ties to Lasell 
College and want- 
ed to "give back" 
to the school. The 
Connors met while 
she was a student 
at LaseU. Mr. 
Connor had grown 
up near the campus 
and considered it 
his "playground" 
when he was a child and often went sledding 
on its hills. 

They met each other at 'Jane's" restau- 
rant near the campus and married a year-and- 
a-half later. They settled back in WeUesley 
where they raised four children and have 
remained there for more than 30 years. 

Mrs. Connor stayed at home to take care 
of their children, but once they were in school, 
she became active in real estate and is currently 
v^th DeWolfe. Mr. Connor took early retire- 
ment from Honeywell after 32 years and is now 
in his second career in corporate relocation. 
Mrs. Connor enjoys being close to the 
College and says, "Lasell feels Uke part of my 
family since I know so many people there." 
Actually, the connection to Lasell CoUege 
goes well beyond the Connors. Their daugh- 
ter, Tracey Connor Young, graduated from 
LaseU in 1984, and Mr. Connor's brother 
married a Lasell graduate, Sally Ehoncan 
Connor '48. 

Mrs. Connor still keeps in touch with 
many of her classmates as well as Ruth Harris, 
who served as dean of students when she 
attended LaseU. In addition, she is an active 
volunteer for her alma mater. Mrs. Connor 
currently serves on the LaseU 150 Campaign's 
Sesquicentennial Celebration Committee, 
charged with planning LaseU's 150th birthday 
festivities during the weekend of May 17-20, 
2001, and is a valued member of the CoUege's 



See PROFILE 

continued on page 16 



Givin 



Receiving 




Katharine A. Umer '83, 
Director of Campaign and 
Gift Planning. 



SMART SOLUTIONS TO 
COMMON QUESTIONS: 
RETIREMENT PLANS AND 
CHARITABLE GIVING. HOW TO 
DO GOOD - AND DO WELL 

jtVs a part of retirement 

planning, many Americans own Individual 
Retirement Accounts (IRAs), and most of 
these IRAs are considered traditional (as 
opposed to Roth or Educational). 

A traditional IRA aUows 
your assets to grow tax- 
deferred, meaning that 
you won't pay any taxes 
on earnings untU you 
withdraw the assets. You 
can begin making with- 
drawals from yotir IRA 
at the age of 59 V2 or 
you can defer them 
untU you are 70 V2 if 
you wish. However, once you reach 70 V2, the IRS 
requires that you take minimum distributions 
from your IRA and pay the deferred income 
taxes at that time. One Lasell alumna, who was 
approaching the minimum distribution age of 
70 1/2, recently posed some interesting questions 
on this subject. 

{y ; I am soon to turn 70 years old. My other 
investments are doing very well, so I don't need 
all of the income that I wiU soon be required to 
withdraw from my IRA. Is there any charitable 
gift plan that will help me to cut the income tax 
due on the IRA withdrawals? Can 1 give the 
excess to LaseU CoUege? What are the alterna- 
tives? 

^ ' Frankly, giving some of your funds from your 
IRA directly to LaseU CoUege would be wonderful 
for the CoUege but may not be in your best tax 
interests, particularly since you have some other 
options. There is a possible bright spot on the 
horizon, however. In March 1999, a bUl was pro- 
posed to the U.S. House of Representatives that 
would permit such gifts without the tax penalty. 
Donors would be able to give IRA money outiight 
to Lasell and other charities, or use it to fund a 
charitable life-income gift that would give them a 
fixed payout for the rest of their lives. As of this 
writing, the bUl is stalled at the committee level, 
but those of us in the charitable community are 
keeping our fingers crossed. I wiU keep you post- 
ed! 

For now, IRAs may be best utilized for chari- 
table giving as a part of your estate plans. (If you 



have any form of assets, no matter the amount, 
that you intend to leave to specific beneficiaries 
following your death, then you have an "estate" to 
plan!) If you have money in your IRA that you are 
contemplating leaving to family members at your 
death, be aware that it can be subject to harsh, 
technical tax rules. The transfer of IRA assets at 
death can tiigger two potential federal taxes: the 
estate tax and income tax. If the IRA assets are 
payable to your surviving spouse, then he/she 
can probably roll over the money into his/her 
own IRA and therefore postpone some or aU of 
these taxes until his/her death. However, if the 
beneficiary is someone other than your spouse, 
(your adult chUdren, for example) then the combi- 
nation of the estate tax and the income tax cotdd 
take more than 70% of the plan assets! Remember: 
the money you put into your IRA is considered 
tax-deferred. The IRS wants its share either from 
you or your heirs. If you leave your IRA assets 
to LaseU CoUege through your WiU, every doUar 
would come to the CoUege tax-free, and the IRS 
would be denied its big bite. 

If you have other non-IRA assets (such as 
cash, stock, real estate, etc.), this money could be 
passed onto your beneficiaries without the burden 
of income tax payments. Therefore, a carefuUy 
structured estate plan could leave a major gift to 
LaseU at a minimal cost to your heirs. 

If you do not wish to leave your entire IRA 
assets to LaseU CoUege, you could consider spUt- 
ting yotu- current IRA into two separate IRA 
accoimts: one for your charitable beneficiaries and 
one for your heirs. (This plan has beneficial tax 
consequences for you that are beyond the scope of 
this article.) 

It is also possible to use IRA assets remaining 
at your death to fund a Charitable Remainder 
Trust (CRT) managed through LaseU CoUege's 
Charitable Trust Program that pays out income to 
your surviving spouse or chUdren. By using the 
IRA assets as the principle to fund the CRT, your 
heirs would avoid paying income tax on the 
money, and the donor would gain savings in 
estate tax pa5nnents. 



Assets subject 
to estate and 
income taxes V 



IRA 



No taxes 
taken! 



\ 



CHILDREN/ 
FAMILY MEMBERS 



Receive perhaps 30 
cents on the doUar 



LASELL 
COLLEGE 



Receives 100 cents 
on the doUar 



Another vehicle to keep in mind while you 
review the possibilities is the charitable gift annu- 
ity. Gift annuities may be an important compo- 
nent of retirement planning for you since they can 
convert low-yield savings accounts or securities 
into higher-pa3dng, secure annual income streams. 
They can nicely complement your other retire- 
ment options, including your IRA. Gift annuities 
can also be very helpful in retirement planning by 
allowing you to estabUsh the annuity now and get 

See GIVING & RECEIVING 
continued on page 13 



12 



LASELL LEAVES 



SPRING 2000 



Guess Who's on the Phone? 

LASELL COLLEGE 1999-2000 STUDENT PHONATHONERS CONNECT 
WITH ALUMNI 

I ASELL COLLEGE IS FORTUNATE TO HAVE A HARD WORKING AND VIBRANT 
group of students dedicated to helping the College raise money for the Annual Fund. Their 
personal connection with alunmi, and their commitment to inspiring alumni to offer finan- 
cial support, has made it possible for Lasell's Annual Fund to continue to succeed by 
stretching resources in response to the College's accelerated growth. 

to Lasell and increased their appreciation of their 
alma mater's alumni support." 

— Thora Thurston, 
Annual Fund Phonathon Supervisor 

"Most of the alumni are happy to hear from us and 
enjoy sharing their fond memories. It is encouraging 
to hear about their experiences and successes." 

— Pam Majka '03 from Meriden, CT, Early 
Childhood major 

"Lasell is a wonderful place, and 

I have enjoyed speaking with all of the alumni. " 

— Ashley Seybold '03 from New London, NH, 
Business major 

"I am happy to be working with the Annual Fund, 
which helps fund scholarships, and that is what made 
it possible for me to come here." 

— Elisa McKeman '03 from Pocasset, MA, 
Psychology major ^ 




1999-2000 student phonathoners. 

Leaves wanted to take the opportunity to intro- 
duce our readers to the students whose voices on 
the end of the phone line reinforce the connection 
so many alumni feel toward Lasell, whether they 
have been back to campus to visit or not. 

"The connection works both ways. The phonathoners' 
conversations with alumni have enhanced their loyalty 



iVfNG & i?FrEIV!NG 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12 

an up-front tax deduction in the year of the gift, 
but defer the payments until you actually need 
them. Deferred gift annuities provide guaran- 
teed fixed income for life at attractive rates, with 
payments starting at least one year after your 
gift. The longer payments are deferred, the 
greater the fixed income Lasell can agree to pay. 
Typically, deferred gift annuities are attractive 
to those who are close to retirement age, 55 or 
older. (See related article on Philip and Nancye 
Van Deusen Connor '57, page 12.) 

Of course, these are simplified, basic expla- 
nations of complex tax-planning techniques. But 
the key points are: 

1. It is best to plan IRA distributions before 
you start taking distributions because you 
have more options then. 

2. Charitable giving may be a useful compo- 
nent in your retirement plans. 

3. Always talk to your own qualified advi- 
sors when considering any sort of charita- 
ble and /or tax-saving plan involving sub- 
stantial sums. Your advisor should be 
able to analyze the options to see which 
one best suits your specific circvunstances 
and goals. 

Lasell College is not qualified to provide 
legal or tax advisory service. Information in this 
colvmin is offered in general terms and should 
not be acted upon without professional advice 
from your attorney or accountant. >*- 



For more information on how gift plarming 
can benefit you and Lasell, please call 
Katharine Umer '83, director of Campaign 
and Gift Planning, at (617) 243-2166 or fill 
out this form and mail to: 

The Heritage Society 

Office of Institutional Advancement 

Lasell College 

1844 Commonwealth Avenue 

Newton, MA 02466-2716 

Please send information on: 

Lasell Gift Annuities 

Charitable Trusts 

Charitable Bequests 

Heritage Society Membership 

Gifts of Appreciated Securities 

Name: 

Class: 

Address: 



City: 



State: 



Zip: 



Telephone: 



All responses will be held in strictest confidence. 



Message from 
the Annual Fund 
Director 

By Noni Linton 

When I accepted the position of alumni 
director at an independent school in the early 
BO'S, I did not realize that a career in fundraising 
would become my passion. I always under- 
stood how important volunteerism and philan- 
thropy were to educational institutions, but I 
came to learn that there are many ways for dol- 
lars to impact the health of an institution. Every 
college, Lasell included, has long- and short- 
term funding needs. The institution's Annual 
Fund and Capital Campaign provide for these 
diverse needs. 

The Lasell College Annual Fund is one of 
the most important fundraising initiatives for 
the institution. It is an ongoing program that 
runs concurrently with the institution's fiscal 
year, from July 1 through Jtme 30. Gifts to this 
Fxmd help support current operating experises, 
including student financial aid, academic pro- 
grams, library resources, athletics, and mainte- 
nance. Gifts to the Lasell Annual Fund and 
pledges made to the Fund through the Student 
Phonathon must be received in fuU by June 30th 
to be included in the yearly total. 

A Capital Campaign is a special multi-year 
fundraising effort in support of capital projects 
such as endowment, building construction, 
renovations, or a combination of these. The 
LaseU 150 Campaign is the College's first multi- 
million-dollar capital campaign that culminates 
in May 2001 with a gala celebration for Lasell's 
Sesquicentennial. The Lasell 150 Campaign is 
raising funds to invest in Lasell's future. Gifts to 
the Campaign will boost the endowment for 
program support; student financial aid; media 
resources and technology; faculty support and 
development; unrestricted capital expenditures; 
and improvements to the physical plant, includ- 
ing renovations to historic Winslow Hall. 

During the Lasell 150 Campaign, n\any 
alumni, parents, and friends of LaseU wiU par- 
ticipate in the Campaign in addition to their 
Annual Fund gifts, thus providing at least 
$500,000 annually for current operating expens- 
es, and contributing to the overall Campaign 
goal of $15,000,000. 

Regardless of where your contribution 
goes, the members of the Office of Institutional 
Advancement are available to help each donor 
maximize her or his contribution to Lasell and, 
at the same time, receive the greatest tax benefit. 

If you have any questions about making 
gifts to the Lasell Annual Fund via cash, credit 
card or stock, please call me at 617-243-2165. 
For questioi\s about making gifts to the Lasell 
150 Campaign, please call Kathy Umer '83, 
director of Campaign and Planned Giving at 
617-243-2166.*^ 



Noni Linton 

Director of Annual Giving 



nuRK^JOMS^: 



SPRING 2000 



LASELL LEAVES <j 



ALUMNI NEWS & EVENTS 




REUNION '00 



fl| The Winslow Archives: 



All Aliunni are invited to Alvunni 

Weekend '00, especially those whose 

year ends in "5" or "0". Jxrne 2-4, 2000. 



^ 

y W 



Re«union re 



•yoon- 



yen /noun (1610) 



La*sell CoUlege 



1 : an act of reuniting: the state of t>eing reunited 
2: a reuniting of penons after separation 
3: the return of a group of people for a special occasion to a 
place formerty frequented or regarded as home... 

la-sel kal-ij(185i) 

1 : a co-«d, four-year professionally oriented lit}eral arts institution of 
higher learning which has come a long way since you were here... 

2: an organized Ijody of persons engaged in a common pursuit with 
mutual interests, i.e., getting back together for an 
all-alumni Reunion! All years welcomel 

June 2-4, 2000 



(t17) 243-2139 

■.JHUiHU 



■■KSBm 



• HWW.laS8tf.6dU 

flJJ-jmi.Blill—i 



Program of Events includes: 



' hasell Night at the Pops 

• Tours of Campus 

• Class Parade and 
Pictures 

' Medallion Presentations 

• Reunion Luncheon 
> Alumni College 



• President's Reception 

• Alumni Art Exhibit 

• Lobster Bakej BBQ 
Dinner and 
Entertainment 

• Duck Tours of Boston 



Board of Management Reunion Chair 
Susan Scichilone Presti '88/'94 

REUNION UAISONS 

1925/1930 Alumni Office 

1935 Barbara Ordway Brewer 

1940 Ruth Fulton Rardin 

1945 Terry Bergeron Hoyt 

1950 Jacqueline Paulding Hauser 

1955 Jackie Cain Shells 

1960 Anne Sutherland Rollins 

1965 Carole Bellew 

1970 Loma Hanson 

1975 Laura Kaplan Ouellet 

1980 Jennifer Burgoyne Sementelli 

1985 Claire McCarthy Dalton 

1990 Christie Comwell Manganis 

1995 Vielkis Gonzalez-Guity 



NOTICE 

If anyone is interested in joining the 
Lasell Alunmi Inc., Board of Management, 
please contact the Alunmi Affairs Office 
or email us at alumni@lasell.edu. The 
mission of the board is to serve the inter- 
ests of Lasell CoUege, to aid deserving 
students, to promote a spirit of fellowship 
among its graduates, past students, facul- 
ty and the administration, and to bind the 
alumni to the College more closely for 
their mutual benefit. 

MIGHT YOU SHARE A BIT OF 
YOUR LIFE WITH LASELL? 

Please be sure to send to the Archives: 

1. Copies of photos (weU labeled with 
the name and dates of the people in 
the picture). 

2. Events Uterature, brochures etc. 

3. PubUcations put out by the CoUege. 

4. If you think it might have an historical 
use later, it probably will, so bring it in. 

5. Lasell memorabilia. 



PRESERVING LASELL'S RICH HERITAGE MEMENTO BY MEMENTO, 
BOOK BY BOOK, PHOTO BY PHOTO 

1 UCKED AWAY IN A SMALL, CROWDED ROOM ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF 
Brennan Library, is a jewel of a repository called the Winslow Archives. There, walls are 
lined with meticulously ordered file cabinets, bookcases are stacked to the ceiling, and 
artifact boxes are purposefully labeled and shelved. 



"Brennan Library is home to the Winslow 
Archives — one of the oldest institutional archives 
in the Boston area," explains AUyson Gray, direc- 
tor of the Brennan Library. "Carefully managing 
materials, such as artifacts, documents, pho- 
tographs, and records so that they are preserved, 
protected, organized, and most importantly, 
accessible to a variety of users, is what the 
archives is all about." 




Here, old yearbooks, report cards, certificates 
of honors and awards, correspondence, and 
copies of Leaves all contribute to preserving 
LaseU's history, and too, the memories of many 
women's lives. 

To its founders, Donald J. Winslow, trustee 
emeritus of Lasell CoUege, and his wife, Charlotte, 
LaseU's Archives is far more than the stored 
chronology of historical events at LaseU. It is a 
cherished work that gives Ufe and context to the 
shared experience of thousands of young women, 
faculty, staff, and individuals who, since its 
founding in 1851, have caUed LaseU CoUege 
their school. 

Theirs is a passion fueled by a Ufetime of 
devotion to the institution, the Winslows readUy 
admit. Donald Winslow's father, Guy Winslow, 
was principal and later president of LaseU from 
1908 to 1947. Don Winslow, who was bom and 
grew up on the campus, saw the institution 
evolve through the decades, and stUl participates 
actively as the institution's historian. 

His effort began after his retirement in 1977 
as chairman of the English Department at Boston 
University. That's when he and Charlotte 
Winslow embarked on the ambitious 
mission of gathering old 
records, documents, 
memorabiha, and arti- 
facts to chart the 
course of history at 
Lasell. The goal 
was, of course, to 
piece together and 
preserve LaseU's 
extraordinary 
past. 

"We searched 
through attics, base- 




ments, closets — aU the nooks and crannies of 
LaseU's wonderful Victorian structures," recaUs 
Charlotte Winslow. "Sadly, many of the docu- 
ments discovered were damaged." Undaunted, 
the Winslows continued to coUect, catalogue, and 
restore the precious documents they unearthed. 
The MemorabUia Room was established in 
1978, when the College assigned an old seminar 
room to the Winslows' project. And in 1997, 
the Winslows' vision, perseverance, and tireless 
devotion to the preservation of LaseU's history 
was honored with the dedication of the 
Winslow Archives. 

WhUe much of the collection in the Winslow 
Archives was found on campus, perhaps the most 
precious records have been graciously donated 
over the years by alumni and their famUies. 
Sometimes wonderful artifacts find their way 
back to LaseU through the kindness of complete 
strangers to the institution. AUyson Gray recaUs 
receiving a package. "An elderly gentleman from 
Maine found a book at a yard sale. It turned out to 
be the Allerlei from 1893, the first yearbook ever 
issued. It was quite a find for us." 

"The most valuable documents in the coUec- 
tion," said Don Winslow, "are the bound cata- 
logues of the CoUege. The catalogues, in meticu- 
lous detail, record every student, with father's 
name and address, the classes in which each of the 
students were enroUed, and of course, their 
grades. The rules of the institution were clearly 
stated, as was the tuition. 

But, Archives Director Jim Boudreau is con- 
cerned about the lack of more recent material. 
"The Archives needs an influx of current material 
to continue its function and historical aspect. This 
smaU room in the Brerman Library holds the story 
dear to the coUective spirit of LaseU CoUege," he 
says. "It is now our responsibiUty to ensure this 
story continues to be told." 

So, if you find yourself sifting through family 
records, riunmaging through old trunks, opening 
boxes that have been pushed into attic eaves and 
long forgotten, please keep your eyes open for 
items from your days at LaseU that you would be 
wiUing to donate to the Archives. In particular, 
the Archives seeks copies of Lasell News, 
issues from 1933 to 1973, memory 
books, report cards, awards and 
honors. For more informa- 
tion on the Archives, 
please contact 
Jim Boudreau at 
617-243-2200. 

The Archives is 
open Monday 10-1 
and Friday 1-4. It 
is located in the 
Brennan Library on 
the second floor. Visitors 
are welcome. »■ 



14 



LASELL LEAVES 



SPRING 2000 



ALUMNI GATHERINGS 



SAVE THE DATE FOR FUTURE 
ALUMNI GATHERINGS! 

If you go south in the winter months, please give us your 
address so that we can send you an invitation to events. 

Throughout the year, the President and members of the 
Institutional Advancement staff travel aroimd the country to 
meet with alumni from aU class years at LaseU gatherings. It's a 
chance to meet and network with other alumni in your geograph- 
ic area while also hearing the latest information about LaseU. 
Recently, many spouses /guests have been attending these events 
and they have enjoyed hearing about their partner's college Life. 
Friendships are renewed and also begun. Please contact the 
Alumni Affairs Office at (617) 243-2139 if you can help to provide 
ideas, organize an event, etc. The office creates and mails aU invi- 
tations, so as host, aU that is needed is to receive the RSVP repUes 
and make some foUow-up phone calls. 




JUNE, '00 

2-4 FRIDAY— SUNDAY 

Reunion Weekend at Lasell 
College Campus 

SEPTEMBER, '00 

23 Saturday 

Cape Cod, MA 

Host: Claire Tracy King '45 

OCTOBER, '00 

15 Sunday 

Family and Friends Weekend/ 

River Day at Lasell CoUege 

OCTOBER, '00 

29 Simday 
New York City 

6:30 p.m. Lion King Performance 
and Back Stage Toiu-. This event 
will sell out quickly, so call now 
to reserve space. Limit fotu 
tickets per alum, $85 per ticket. 
(617) 796-4658. Reception at a 
local restaurant prior to the 
show. Cost to be announced. 

NOVEMBER, '00 

4 Saturday 

CTVaUey 

W. Hartford, CT. 

Hartford Golf Club 

Host: Janet Hatch Hamilton '54 



Cape Cod gathering at the Yarmouth Inn, Yannouthport, MA in September, 
1999. Janet Wyman Meade '51 hosted the event. 





Marjorie Jones Joslyn '34 led the 
singing of the alma mater at the 
CT Valley luncheon. 



Vermont area gathering, October 1999. Generously sponsored by Jill Fucci '89 
at her restaurant. La Villa in Shelboume, VT. 





CT Valley — Through the membership of Faye Wadhams Smith '38, the CT Valley luncheon 
was held at the Hartford Golf Club. Joan Pethybridge Thompson '57 hosted the event 



Cape Cod — Professor 
Joe Aieta, who has 
taught at Lasell for over 
30 years, shared his 
views on three decades 
of change at Lasell. 



"NOT YOUR ORDINARY RAFFLE'' 
TO BENEFIT ALUMNI 
SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

At Reimion Weekend, on June 3, 2000, 
LaseU Alumni Inc. will conduct the drawing 
for its seventh annual "Not Your Ordinary 
Raffle" to raise money for much needed 
scholarships for deserving students. Last 
year, $12,000 was raised from the sale of tick- 
ets for 30 prizes worth in excess of $5,000. 
Prizes received to date are: 

PRIZE 

$150 Gift basket 

donated by Allied Domecq Quick Serve Restaurants 

$100 Savings account 

donated by Auburndale Cooperative Bank 

$100 Gift Certificate 

donated by Baby Place, Susan Y. Charton '69 

$76 -Two begirmer indoor rock climbing lessons 

donated by Boulder Morty's (Dotty Andler Silber '63) 

$200 Leica Camera 

donated by Brian and Stormy Horton Bell '92 

$25 Gift certificate 

donated by Bullfinch's 

$60 certificate for a facial 

donated by Carriage House Salon in Cambridge 

$100 Cash prize 

donated by Jean Campbell '44, Corporator 

$100 Cash prize 

donated by Nancy Lazvson Donahue '49, Trustee 

Membership gift certificate 

donated by European Health Spa 

$100 Cash prize 

donated by Champe Fisher, Trustee 

$50 Gift Certificate 

donated by Gleason's Flowers 

$190 Subscription to Want AD Publications, Inc. 

donated by Nancy Curtis Grellier '49, Trustee 

$275 Original Oil on canvas - Bass Harbor, ME 

donated by Priscilla Spence Hall '43, Overseer 

$100 Cash prize 

donated by Kathryn Poore Hamel '49, Overseer 

$50 Floral Arrangement 

donated by Jacqueline Paulding Hauser '50 

$100 Cash prize 

donated by P. Lynn Kiefer Holt '61, Trustee 

$150 Gift certificate 

donated by Hill Jeweler's, Sudbury 

$25 Cash Prize 

donated by Susan Slocum Klingbeil '45, Trustee 

$25 Gift certificate 
donated by Kevin Max Hair Design 

$50 Cash prize 

donated by Jack Leonard, Trustee 

Weekend Stay for Two 

donated by Lasell Inn Bed & Breakfast 

$100 Gift Certificate for L.L.Bean 

donated by Jean Sargent Lee '49, Trustee 

Dinner for Two 

donated by Longfellow's Wayside Inn 

$100 Gift Certificate - Marriott Hotel 

donated by Kathryn Morgan Lucey '67 

$175 Birdsey Watercolor 

donated by Barbara Stickle Mode '47 Interiors 

$100 Gift Certificate 

donated by Pillar House 

$265 Regatta III by Marcia Gibbons 

donated by Renjeau Galleries 

$38 Two tickets to a show in 2000-2001 

donated by Turtle Lane Playhouse 

$100 Cash prize 

donated by Lynn Blodgett Williamson '46, Trustee 

$100 Four tickets 

donated by Worcester Foothills Theatre 

2 - $250 Cash prizes 

donated by Patricia Zinkowski, Trustee 






I 



SPRING 2000 



LASELL LEAVES 



15 



LASELL COLLEGE ATHLETIC CALENDAR FOR SPRING 2000 AND FALL 2000 



(Listings that appear in all caps denote liome games. 
Occasionally, due to weather, etc., dates and times may cliange. 
For confirmation, please check zvith the Athletics Department at 
617-243-2147.) 



LASELL COLLEGE SOFTBALL SPRING 2000 

MARCH 

22 Wednesday BECKER COLLEGE* 3:30 p.m. 

25 Saturday MAINE MARITIME ACADEMY»(2) 12:00 p.m. 

26 Sunday St. Joseph College (Conn.)(2) 12:00 p.m. 

27 Monday JOHNSON & WALES UNIVERSITY 4:00 p.m. 
30 Thursday Pine Manor College 4:00 p.m. 



OCTOBER 



2 

4 

7 

10 

14 

16 

18 

23 

26 



Monday 

Wednesday 

Saturday 

Tuesday 

Saturday 

Monday 

Wednesday 

Monday 

Thursday 



BECKER COLLEGE* 
Babson College 
MAINE MARITIME* 
MIT 

SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY 
DANIEL WEBSTER 
Tufts University 
MT. IDA COLLEGE* 
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY 



APRIL 



Saturday 
Monday 
Saturday 
Sunday 

13 Thursday 

16 Sunday 

18 Tuesday 

19 Wednesday 

24 Monday 

25 Tuesday 
27 Thursday 

29 Saturday 

30 Sunday 

* Denotes North 



WHEELOCK COLLEGE*(2) 12:30 p.m. 

LESLEY COLLEGE*(2) 3:00 p.m. 

Bay Path Tournament(2) TBA 

Bay Path Tournament(l or 2) TBA 

Newbury College (2) 3:30 p.m. 
BAY PATH COLLEGE»(2) " 12:00 p.m. 

MT. IDA COLLEGE*(2) 3:30 p.m. 

Rivier College 5:00 p.m. 

Daniel Webster College (2) 3:30 p.m. 

ELMS COLLEGE*(2) 3:00 p.m. 

NAC Quarterfinals TBA 

NAC Semifinals and Finals TBA 
Rain date -NAC Semifinals and Finals TBA 
Atlantic Conference game 



NOVEMBER 

1 Wednesday North Atlantic Quarterfinals 

4 Saturday North Atlantic Semi-finals 

5 Sunday North Atlantic Championship 
*North Atlantic Conference Match 



4:00 p.m. 
4:00 p.m. 
11:00 p.m. 
3:30 p.m. 
1:30 p.m. 
3:30 p.m. 
4:00 p.m. 
2:30 p.m. 
2:30 p.m. 



2:30 p.m. 

TBA 

TBA 



Head Coach: Giovanni A. Pacini (3rd year) 

Assistant Coach: Joseph Campbell (3rd year) 

Team Manager: Michael Starr 

Team Captains: Eric Lewandowski, Bryan Silveira, Brian Smith 

Head Athletic Trainer: David Steame 



WOMEN'S SOCCER FALL 2000 



LASELL COLLEGE MEN'S LACROSSE SPRING 2000 

FEBRUARY 

26 Saturday Bentley-scrimmage TBA 



MARCH 

4 Saturday Manhattanville College @ 

West Haven High School, CT 
11 Saturday 

22 Wednesday SALEM STATE COLLEGE 
28 Sunday Wesleyan University 

APRIL 

4 Tuesday WHEATON COLLEGE 

9 Sunday Castleton State College 

13 Thursday Franklin Pierce College 

15 Saturday Daniel Webster CoDege 

20 Thursday UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 

22 Saturday NICHOLS COLLEGE 

25 Tuesday CURRY COLLEGE 

28 Friday MT. IDA COLLEGE 

FIELD HOCKEY FALL 2000 



12:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 
3:30 p.m. 
3:30 p.m. 



3:30 p.m. 
1:30 p.m. 
3:45 p.m. 
1:00 p.m. 
3:30 p.m. 
12:00 p.m. 
4:00 p.m. 
3:30 p.m. 



SEPTEMBER 

9 Saturday 
14 Thursday 

17 Sunday 
26 Tuesday 
28 Thursday 
30 Saturday 

OCTOBER 

2 Monday 
Thursday 
Saturday 
Tuesday 
Thursday 
14 Saturday 
16 Monday 

18 Wednesday 
21 Saturday 
25 Wednesday 

28 Saturday 

29 Sunday 



5 
7 
10 
12 



Fitchburg State College 

Mt. Ida College* 

Notre Dame College 

Umass Boston 

Eastern Nazarene College 

DANIEL WEBSTER COLLEGE 



Becker College 

Lesley College (Bunker Hill CO 

MAINE MARITIME* 

Emerson College 

Pine Manor College 

BAY PATH* 

Brandeis 

JOHNSON & WALES 

ELMS COLLEGE* 

North Atlantic Conference 

Quarterfinal 

North Atlantic Conference 

Semi-Finals 

North Atlantic Conference Finals 



SEPTEMBER 



Head Coach: Catherine Kidd (2nd year) 

Assistant Coaches: Marcey Englestein (2nd year) & 
Rich Perry (2nd year) 

WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL FALL 2000 



12:00 p.m. 
4:00 p.m. 
12:00 p.m. 
TBA 
3:30 p.m. 
1:00 p.m. 



4:00 p.m. 
4:00 p.m. 
2:00 p.m. 
TBA 
4:00 p.m. 
1:30 p.m. 
TBA 
TBA 
1:00 p.m. 
TBA 

TBA 

TBA 



7 Thursday 


Fitchburg State College 


4:00 p.m. 


SEPTEMBER 






10 Sunday 


ST. JOSEPH'S COLLEGE (ME) 


11:00 a.m. 


8 


Friday 


Johnson & Wales Tourney 


TBA 


13 Wednesday 


NICHOLS COLLEGE 


4:00 p.m. 


9 


Saturday 


Johnson & Wales Tourney 


TBA 


15 Friday 


SALEM STATE COLLEGE 


4:00 p.m. 


12 


Tuesday 


PINE MANOR 


7:00 p.m. 


17 Sunday 


Husson College(at Gorham HS) 


TBA 


14 


Thursday 


DANIEL WEBSTER 


7:00 p.m. 


22 Friday 


ELMS COLLEGE 


4:00 p.m. 


16 


Saturday 


TRl-MATCH BAY PATH/ 


12:00 p.m 


25 Monday 


EASTERN CONNECTICUT 


4:00 p.m. 






NEWBURY 






COLLEGE 




19 


Tuesday 


Mt. Ida* 


7:00 p.m. 


28 Thursday 


Ehns College 


4:00 p.m. 


21 


Thursday 


REGIS COLLEGE 


7:00 p.m. 








23 


Saturday 


Becker College* 


1:00 p.m. 


OCTOBER 






28 


Thursday 


Anna Maria College 


7:00 p.m. 


3 Tuesday 


BECKER COLLEGE* 


4:00 p.m. 


30 


Saturday 


Tri-match w/ Wentworth & UMass 


TBA 


7 Saturday 


Salve Regina 


1:00 p.m. 










8 Sunday 


THOMAS COLLEGE 


TBA 


OCTOBER 






12 Thursday 


Regis College 


4:00 p.m. 


2 


Monday 


Rivier College 


7:00 


14 Saturday 


WHEELOCK COLLEGE* 


3:30 p.m. 


4 


Wednesday 


Daruel Webster 


7:00 p.m. 


17 Tuesday 


American International College 


4:00 p.m. 


6 


Friday 


Eastern Cormecticut Toumey 


TBA 


19 Thursday 


Western New England College 


4:00 p.m. 


7 


Saturday 


Eastern Connecticut Toumey 


TBA 


28 Saturday 


NAC Semi-final 


TBA 


11 


Wednesday 


WESTHELD STATE 


7:00 p.m. 


29 Sunday 


NAC Finals 


TBA 


12 


Thursday 


NEWBURY COLLEGE 


7:00 p.m. 


*North Atlantic Conference Game 




14 


Saturday 


BECKER COLLEGE* 


12:00 p.m 








18 


Wednesday 


Emerson College 


7:00 p.m. 


Head Coach: Jessica Cormier (2nd year) 




19 


Thursday 


Atlantic Union 


7:00 p.m. 


Assistant Coach: Meredith Miscio (2nd year) 




24 


Thursday 


Lesley College* 


7:30 p.m. 


Head Trainer: David Steame 




28 


Thursday 


MT. IDA COLLEGE* 


7:00 p.m. 








NOVEMBER 






i^FN'<; ^nrcM FALL 2000 




4 


Saturday 


North Atlantic Conference 




SEKIEMBER 










Tournament 


TBA 


9 Saturday 


MA College Invitational Tournament 




*North Atlantic CorJerence Match 




10 Sunday 


MA College Invitational Tournament 












16 Saturday 


Anna Maria College 


1:00 p.m. 


Head Coach: Mary Tom 




18 Monday 


FUCHBURG STATE COLLEGE 


4:00 p.m. 


Head Trainer: David Steame 




20 Wednesda> 


' NEWBURY COLLEGE* 


4:00 p.m. 










25 Monday 


Elms College* 


4:00 p.m. 










30 Saturday 


Wheaton College 


1:00 p.m. 











PROFIIF 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12 

Alumni Board of Management. 

In recognition of her dedication and service 
to Lasell, Mrs. Connor was appointed to the Lasell 
Board of Corporators. She was also honored with 
a Lasell Medallion in 1997 at her 40th Reunion. 

Thrilled with the growth of the College, espe- 
cially in athletics, Mrs. Connor is most impressed 
by the career-minded focus of current Lasell 
students. The Connors are pleased to support 
Lasell through their deferred gift armuity and, in 
fact, it was Mr. Connor's idea to establish it. He 
wanted to make a contribution to an institution 
with which he has had close ties since his youth 
and the gift gave him a feeling of personal 
involvement with his wife's alma mater. For their 
retirement plans, the deferred gift annuity made 
the most sense because they didn't need the 
income immediately but they could benefit from 
the tax deduction. Not only did they get to make 
a gift to Lasell College, but they also were able to 
secure their retirement finances in multiple ways. 
It was a win-win situation for everyone! 

Gift Planner's Note: In the last issue of the 
Leaves (Winter 1999), we discussed charitable gift 
annuities. You can establish a gift annuity at 
Lasell College with cash or appreciated securities 
($10,000 irunimum) and receive an annual, secure 
payout that never changes. You will also receive 
a charitable deduction on your tax biU. If you use 
appreciated securities to fund your gift annuity, 
your capital gains tax is significantly reduced. On 
top of these financial benefits to you, you have 
the satisfaction of making a wonderful gift to 
Lasell CoUege and participating in the Lasell 150 
Campaign: a Campaign to Celebrate Lasell's 
Sesquicentennial. **- 




LASELL 

COLLEGE 




SPRING 2000 

© 2000, Lasell College. 

All RIGHTS RESERVED. 

Lasell Leaves is distributed twice a year, 
free of charge to aluinni, students, and 
friends of LaseU. 

The publication is produced by 

The Office of Institutional Advancement 

Lasell College 

1844 Commonwealth Avenue 

Newton, MA 02466-2716 

Tel. (617) 243-2141 

Dean for Institutional Advancement 
Ruth S. Shiiman 

Editor 
Fran Weil 

Associate Editor 
EUzabeth Pendergast 

Class Notes Editor 
Ellen Bresnahan 

Director of Support Services 
Jeanne A. Johnsen '72 

Layout/Printing 
Signatiire Comn\unications 



16 



LASELL LEAVES 



SPRING 2000 



MAi.'^l 



•iti